reconstructed memories 2004-2012

fully recreated and falsified family history in images

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Reconstructed Memories is a unique print series that uses my personal family photographs (both historical and present day) to rewrite history from my vantage point. I utilize my family’s historical collection and my personal imagery to address questions I have about my history, memory, and the traditions of photography itself. By choosing unrelated images and digitally manipulating them into unlikely combinations, I build new memories. I forge new relationships, address old confrontations, imagine different experiences, and face old demons. I disrupt linear narratives and recompose events, establishing my family history as a construct. Once these new snapshots have been finalized digitally, they are printed, aged and weathered according to their appropriate time period. This rebuilding of memory has allowed me to establish my own version of reality, as I prefer it. Reconstructed Memories takes the form of editioned print series, a series of reconstructed “false” family photo albums that adhere to my revisionist history. It has been exhibited as installations, and mixed media pieces. This body of work has two catagories, Dystopia portraits and Snapshots.

Memory eludes with its fluid consistency. It shifts and swims away, returning in a different form all together. In childhood we fell so certain of our thoughts, our memories of events. Later in life we begin to waver, to be less certain. Life becomes grey. We begin to wonder what is truth, what is fact, and what is imagination writing its own experience all together. We see a photograph as a child and bond immediately to its colors, its atmosphere, its emotion, and what we think is its’ truth. To separate the image’s influence from the event itself becomes impossible. It has imbedded itself in our brains, mud